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Frequently Asked Questions

Q: How do I get rid of Blanket Weed?

A: Every year as soon as the sun comes out and the water temperature rises, all beginners and enthusiastic, water garden hobbyists alike, at some point will be confronted with a surge of green slime also known as Blanket Weed. 

Click here to find out how to solve the problem

Q: How do I get rid of Duckweed?

A: Unfortunately duckweed seems to be the curse of every garden pond.  Just when your pond is looking at its best, and your plants are starting their spring growth, along it will come invading our beautiful ponds with millions of tiny green floating leaves which spread out over the water’s surface at a rate of knots

Click here to read advice on Duckweed

Q: How do I make a bog garden?

A: Throughout the Water Garden and pond industry there is much confusement as to what actually is a bog garden, so in this article we're going to set the record straight!

Click here to read our Bog Garden Article

Q: What are deep water pond plants?

A: Here at Lilies Water Gardens, we have created our own name for a category of very special plants and some of these pond plants belong in several different categories.

Click to read more about deep water pond plants

Q: What type of oxygenating plants do I need for my pond?

A: Out of all of the different types of water plants, it’s the oxygenators that are the most diverse in their uses and they play the biggest role in maintaining healthy, clean water. 

Click here to read more about oxygenating plants

Q: Should I feed my pond plants?

A: Just the other day I read a very miss-leading instruction on a website telling people, as quoted, to “Never add fertiliser to your pond”. This couldn’t be further from the truth as all pond plants are extremely heavy feeders.

Click here to read more about feeding your pond plants

Q: Do I need to use aquatic baskets when planting pond plants?

A: The answer is no and the explanation for this is simple.   pond plants are sold to enhance your pond and there are three types of pond, Fibreglass, Lined and Natural, then there are two types of streams, Lined and Natural, for this reason why we don’t supply plants pre-potted in aquatic baskets. 

Click here to learn more about aquatic baskets

Q: How many marginal plants should I plant per square foot or metre?

A: I have read so many articles on this subject and unfortunately I have to say, they are all very miss-leading. However, I should emphasise that there is no ’Golden Rule’!

Click here to learn more about marginal plants

Q: How many oxygenating plants do I need for my pond?

A: There is no possible way of recommending the correct amount of plants per square metre or square foot and not just that, half the varieties of oxygenating plants are not even sold in bunches!

Click here to learn more about oxygenating plants

Q: Do I need to use aquatic soil and aquatic gravel when planting pond plants?

A: The use of aquatic soil is very important, not so much as it is low in nitrates, that reduces blanket weed and algae, but more so because aquatic soil has been screened which makes it free from any pollutants such as soil used straight from your garden or from next doors garden where a wandering cat may have visited!

Click here to learn more about aquatic soil and gravel

Q: How do I plant up a swimming pond?

A: Swimming ponds ideally should be located in full sun and house two different areas of the same size for swimming and for your plants. The swimming area should be around 8ft deep and the Re-Generation area or areas, should be about 1 to 2ft deep. 

Click here to learn more about swimming ponds

Q: Do I need surface cover and pond plants with floating leaves for my pond?

A: Floating leaves on the water’s surface are beneficial to the health of all ponds, streams and lakes. Not only do they provide oxygen and take out harmful nitrates, but they also provide valuable cover for wildlife and cut down on surface sunlight thus reducing algae blooms (green water) and blanket weed.

Click here to learn more about surface cover for your pond

Q: How do I create a wildlife pond?

A: From the smallest sink to the largest clay bottomed lake, if you add water to your garden, you will soon have a variety of wildlife on your doorstep, that will either fly, walk, slither or hop gladly welcoming  the water haven that you have lovingly created and provided.

Click here to learn more about creating a wildlife pond

Q: How do I attract wildlife to my pond?

A: Some creatures will spend their seasonal life cycle undergoing various stages of maturity from, eggs  to nymphs, and from larvae to breeding adults in the water, on the water, or under the surface, while others such as some birds, reptiles and mammals will simply use the water to drink, swim, hunt or bath. It is therefore essential that a wildlife garden should have gentle sloping sides to allow all that use it a safe haven and a get out clause!

Click here to learn more about how to attract wildlife to your pond

Q: Can you eat pond plants?

A: These plants not only look attractive and bring the water garden to life but, are also beneficial for the wildlife and for getting a good balance in the pond to maintain healthy water. A vast selection of plants have a hidden use, being edible or medicinal or sometimes both!

Click here to learn more about eating pond plants and their uses

Q: How do I get rid of and treat algae problems in my pond?

A: There are hundreds of different types of Fresh-Water Algae and the most common problematic forms to invade our ponds are Blanket Weed (Filamentous Algae) and Plankton Algae more commonly known as ‘Green-Water Algae’. 

Click here to learn more about how to treat algae problems in your pond

Q: What are free floating pond plants?

A: Plants with floating leaves cut down on sunlight and help prevent green water and blanket weed problems.   For this reason, they are among the most popular of all aquatic plants.

Click here to learn more about free floating pond plants

Q: How do I plant marginal pond plants?

A: Marginal plants are true aquatics that will thrive where the water level meets the land.  In the natural world, this is exactly what happens.

Click here to learn more about marginal pond plants

Q: What plants do I plant to cover exposed pond liner?

A: Choosing the right plants is very important as we must consider the wildlife that will live in and around it. We should ultimately view this as a working partnership between you both. 

Click here to learn more about plants used to cover explosed pond liner

Q: How do I attract British amphibians to my pond?

A: There are two important factors to consider first though, and the first the design of your pond. The second is, to incorporate and establish the right types of pond plants that these little fellows will love.

Click here to learn more about how to attract British amphibians to your pond

Q: How do I plant water lilies?

A: The first thing to consider before buying your water lilies, is the location in which they will be planted. All varieties will thrive in a sunny location and all will grow stronger, faster, and produce more flowers in warmer shallow waters.

Click here to learn more about planting water lilies

Q: Can I plant up my pond in the autumn?

A: For any type of gardening, the planting is the process before the reward, so this makes Autumn a very good time to plant certain types of pond plants as they will already be established and  therefore, put on a good display of foliage and flowers in the Spring. 

Click here to learn more about planting in the autumn

Q: What pests are eating my pond plants and water lilies?

A: There are a few significant threats to your pond plants and water lilies that you need to be made aware of: black flies and white flies, spider mites, leaf spots, crown rot, snail infestation, Water Lily Beetles and Chinese Mark Moths.

Click here to learn more about pond plant pests

Q: How do I over winter my pond plants?

A: Over-wintering pond plants is easier than you think, but it’s more about tidying up to please the eye than anything else, as after all, most of the time there is no manual intervention needed on the autumn maintenance of naturally growing water plant habitats. 

Click here to learn more about over wintering your pond plants

Q: Are pond snails good for my pond?

A: There are around 30 different species of fresh water snails in the UK, many of which, are very small and currently unavailable to buy. 

Click here to learn more about pond snails

Q: How do I attract dragonflies and damselflies to my pond?

A: Insects have survived the test of time, and Dragonflies and Damselflies are no exception. Very little has changed in their evolution over the last 300 million years, and these prehistoric flying insects have certainly seen a few changes!

Click here to learn more about attracting dragonflies and damselflies to your pond

Lilies Water Gardens Latest Blog Posts

Pond planting in the autumn

(Sun, 15 Oct 2017 14:32:03 +0000)

Pond planting in the autumn For any type of gardening, the planting is the process before the reward, so this makes Autumn a very good time to plant certain types of pond plants as they  will already be established and  … Continue reading

Pond Plants to suit all your needs

(Sun, 18 Jun 2017 08:53:20 +0000)

Pond Plants to suit all your needs   When it comes to planting up your pond or water garden, knowing where to start can be a daunting task.  There are a lot of factors to consider when selecting the right … Continue reading

Hydrocharis Morsus Ranae-Frogbit

(Sun, 18 Jun 2017 08:32:15 +0000)

  Hydrocharis Morsus Ranae-Frogbit   Everyone who owns a pond, wants free-floating pond plants as part of their planting scheme. However, there are not many to choose from as the majority are either tropical/annual such as  Salvinias,  Water Hyacinth and … Continue reading

Innula Hookeri for Attracting Wildlife

(Sun, 04 Jun 2017 09:05:46 +0000)

Inula Hookeri for Attracting Wildlife This often over-looked plant is simply amazing.  Inula Hookeri is a clump forming, moisture loving perennial plant that grows up to a height of 80 cm.  Inula produces a mass of bright yellow flowers that … Continue reading

Blanket weed or Blanket Answer

(Fri, 19 May 2017 19:46:33 +0000)

  Blanket Weed or Blanket Answer! Every year as soon as the sun comes out and the water temperature rises, all beginners and enthusiastic, water garden hobbyists alike, at some point will be confronted with a surge of green slime … Continue reading

Caddis Flies

(Sun, 14 May 2017 07:55:54 +0000)

Caddis Flies   The Latin name for Caddis Flies is Trichoptera and there are over 7000 species worldwide and around 200 species in the UK.  Caddis Flies can be found almost anywhere where there is fresh water as they favour … Continue reading

Sagittaria Species and Cultivars

(Sun, 14 May 2017 07:46:32 +0000)

  Sagittaria Species and Cultivars Also known as Duck Potato, Swamp Potato and Arrowhead, Sagittaria are true shallow and deep water marginal plants that are common in the wild throughout the Northern Hemisphere.  There are about 30 wild species and … Continue reading

Water Hyacinths and Water Lettuce

(Mon, 01 May 2017 19:30:06 +0000)

Water Hyacinths and Water Lettuce I have written many articles on both of these free floating, tropical plants and I thought I should just remind you all that they are not frost hardy, and so for that very reason, should … Continue reading

New Iris Louisiana Cultivars

(Sun, 30 Apr 2017 07:31:55 +0000)

  New Iris Louisiana Cultivars About 7 years ago, I started a collection of Iris Louisiana.  Importing live plants is a tricky procedure that involves a lot of time, effort, money and red tape but, as a collector of rare … Continue reading

Moorhens

(Sun, 16 Apr 2017 08:48:09 +0000)

Moorhens For those of you that are lucky enough to be proud owners of larger areas of water, there is a water bird that you should welcome with open arms should you be lucky enough of course, if they decide … Continue reading